MAPS2020 THE DEAD WEB – THE END

Published on January 11th, 2020


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The Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art celebrates the Media Art Preservation project in 2020 with a two-day MAPS 2020 conference on 13–14 February 2020. Continuing the work revolved around the conversation and the preservation of media art, started in 2015, involving international conservators, art historians and experts.

12-13 February 2020
The Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art, Budapest

 

The Ludwig Museum – Museum of Contemporary Art celebrates the Media Art Preservation project in 2020 with a two-day MAPS 2020 conference on 13–14 February 2020. Continuing the work revolved around the conversation and the preservation of media art, started in 2015, involving international conservators, art historians and experts.

Among contemporary art practices some are linked to technological developments and which have been designated, with varying degrees of indistinction, as “media art”, “new media art” or “digital art”.

With an exhibition called “The Dead Web – The End” foregrounds Canadian, Swiss and Hungarian artists whose practices can be situated in media art will start a conservation about the obsolescence of the internet. The project and the exhibition is referred to the possibility of a collapse of the World Wide Web.

 

abstract

Breathing Life into the Living Dead

Can internet art be made to last in a sustainable way? It is no surprise that artists are keen to use and respond to new material in their practices. With every new invention, throughout the years, museum conservators tried to follow and adapted their working methods to the new challenges. Similarly, with the rise of digital and internet artworks conservators try to think of solutions to preserve the collected artworks. While this works well in some cases, in many cases changes to the artwork happen as most hardware and software follow the design of planned-obsolescence. As a consequence endless migration and emulation projects are set up to prolong the functioning of the artworks. It makes sense to use upgraded technology to keep an artwork going. Yet this enduring rat race becomes questionable when thinking about the environmental impact of digitals. In this presentation I will discuss the oxymoron ‘digital sustainability’. While acknowledging the inherent contradiction, by showing different examples I will argue that digital sustainability may be less about technical solutions, and more about rethinking conservation in favour of the networks of care and living memory.

 

Image credit: Projet EVA: L’Objet de l’Internet, 2017


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